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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to NCEMCH.

Search For: Keyword: High risk children

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Displaying records 151 through 160 of 189 found.
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Knitzer J, Raver CC. 2000. What we know about how to promote school readiness in high-risk young children: An analysis of the challenges and opportunities. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 22 pp.

Annotation: This paper explores what can be done to ensure that young children who experience significant levels of risk to their healthy physical, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and language development in early childhood are able to enter school ready to succeed. The first section of the paper provides examples of the range of interventions that are being used to promote nurturing and cognitively stimulating environments for these children. Section two identifies what is known about the most important attributes of interventions designed to improve outcomes for high-risk young children. Section three highlights needed infrastructure elements. The final section briefly explores issues including challenges of efficacy, cost, outreach, and scale and policy. References are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Child abuse, Cognitive development, Collaboration, Early childhood development, High risk children, Language development, Psychosocial development, School readiness, Young children

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Baldwin V. 2000. Higher Education Curricula for Integrated Service Providers: Final report. Monmouth, OR: Teaching Research Division, Western Oregon University, 50 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Higher Education Curricula for Integrated Service Providers project during the period July 1,1994, through June 1, 2000.The purpose of this project was to improve family-centered services at the local level by helping colleges, universities, and professionals develop models of interprofessional training and enhance the knowledge and skills that would assist them in effecting locally integrated services for families with high-risk children and adolescents. The report, which includes an abstract, is divided into the following sections: (1) purpose of the project and relationship to Social Securty Act Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs, (2) goals and objectives, (3) methodology, (4) evaluation, (5) results and outcomes, (6) publications and products, (7) dissemination and utilization of results, (8) future plans and follow-up, and (9) type and amount of support and resources needed to replicate. The report includes 11 appendices, which encompass surveys, reports, a white paper, a proposal, annotated bibliographies, and other supplemental materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Education, Families, Family centered services, Family support services, Final reports, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Local programs, Professional training, Service integration

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Communities Can. 1999-. Communities of excellence. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, annual.

Annotation: These booklets focus on the efforts of the Federal Interagency Coordinating Council (FICC) and the Communities Can program, a program that recognizes outstanding communities nationwide for their success in serving children, including children with disabilities, and their families. Each booklet features stories about five Communities of Excellence selected in each year in which families who need services receive these services without undue difficulties and without a long search. The stories describes how the members of these communities made great progress toward improving service delivery for children and families. In addition, each booklet provides an overview of the program, explains the mechanics behind the Communities of Excellence awards, and discusses the quest for further improvement. Each booklet includes one appendix: more about the FICC. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Children with special health care needs, Community programs, Families, Family centered community based care, High risk children, Model programs, National programs

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Karoly L, Greenwood PW, Everingham SS, Hoube J, Kilburn MR, Rydell CP, Sanders M, Chiesa J. 1998. Investing in our children: What we know and don't know about the costs and benefits of early childhood interventions. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 159 pp., exec. summ. (16 pp.).

Annotation: This book reports on a review of early childhood interventions which aimed to quantify the benefits of these programs to children, their parents, and society at large. The review defined early childhood interventions as attempts by government agencies or other organizations to improve child health and development, educational attainment, and economic well-being. It is restricted to programs targeted to overcome the cognitive, emotional, and resource limitations that may characterize the environments of disadvantaged children during the first several years of life. It describes early intervention programs and their benefits; compares costs, savings, and benefits; and discusses issues relevant to investment decisions.

Contact: National Book Network, 4501 Forbes Blvd , Lanham , MD 20706, Telephone: (301) 459-3366 Fax: (301) 429-5746 E-mail: custserv@nbnbooks.com Web Site: http://www.nbnbooks.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-2530-9.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Cost effectiveness, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Family support, High risk children, Low income groups, Minority groups, Social problems, Young children

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Tompkins JR, Brooks BL, Tompkins TJ. 1998. Child advocacy: History, theory, and practice. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 134 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses child advocacy as a process that seeks to champion the right of all children and to make every child's needs known and met. The text is directed at analyzing the alienation of children from supportive environments that are vital to children's psychological and social development. Advocacy is viewed as a process that seeks to champion the rights of all children and to make every child's needs known and met. The contents include a discussion of the emergence of child advocacy at the national level, child advocacy as the National Institute of Mental Health's highest priority, the 1971 White House Conference on Children, advocacy models in North Carolina, a definition of child advocacy in the 1990s, the ecological theory of advocacy, the advocacy needs of children, the purpose of advocacy, proactive advocacy, a case study of advocacy, university and community collaboration, a parent training approach, a child advocacy commission model, developing local advocacy councils, advocacy in the treatment and education of adjudicated children, and delivery of services through boards for children in trouble.

Contact: Carolina Academic Press, 700 Kent Street, Durham, NC 27701, Telephone: 919-489-7486 Fax: (919) 493-5668 E-mail: cap@cap-press.com Web Site: http://www.cap-press.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-89089-959-2.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child welfare, Children, Children's rights, Collaboration, Communities, Conferences, High risk children, History, Local MCH programs, National Institute of Mental Health, North Carolina, Parent education, Universities

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Huang FY. 1997 (ca.). Health insurance coverage of the children of immigrants in the United States. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 23 pp.

Annotation: This study assesses the health insurance coverage of children of immigrants and variations within immigrant populations. The data are based on the March supplements of the Census Bureau's Current Population Survey for 1994 and 1996. The report includes references.

Contact: Harvard University, University Hall, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 495-1000 Fax: (617) 432-0173 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Health insurance, High risk children, Immigrants, Uninsured persons

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U.S. General Accounting Office. 1997. Health insurance: Coverage leads to increased health care access for children. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the effect of health insurance coverage on children's access to health care. Prepared in response to a Congressional request, this report also discusses whether expanding publicly funded insurance improves children's access to health care and what barriers, in addition to lack of insurance, may deter children from obtaining health care. The findings of the report are the result of a literature review covering the past ten years, generally based on analyses of large national surveys. The report includes references.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-98-14.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child morbidity, Children, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health insurance, Health promotion, High risk children, Hospitalization, Low income groups, Medicaid, National surveys, Preventive health services, Primary care, Primary care, Uninsured persons

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U.S. General Accounting Office. 1997. At-risk and delinquent youth: Multiple programs lack coordinated federal effort. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the 1997 Congressional testimony of the Associate Director for Education and Employment Issues for the U.S. Government Accounting Office on the effectiveness of Federal programs for at-risk and delinquent youth. Issues addressed include: 1) who administers federal programs serving at-risk and delinquent youth; 2) how much money is spent on these programs; and 3) what is known about their effectiveness. The appendices detail spending amounts and specific services provided by federal agencies and their programs for fiscal year 1996. The report includes references.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/T-HEHS-98-38.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessment, Federal assistance, Federal legislation, Health care financing, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Outcome evaluation, Policy analysis, Program coordination, Program evaluation, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention, Violence prevention, Vocational education

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Kaufmann RK, Dodge JM. 1997. Prevention and early interventions for young children at risk for mental health and substance abuse problems and their families: A background paper. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, 47 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes the major research on risk and protective factors for mental disorders and substance abuse and explores them from the perspective of three ecological domains: young children and their families, communities and community programs, and systems of care. It also identifies successful prevention and early intervention approaches, as well as challenges and areas that require additional research, and provides direction for future field interventions. Contents include an executive summary, introduction and background, the role of risk and protective factors in young children's lives, the role of families in prevention and early intervention, the role of communities and community programs, a review of selected comprehensive prevention and early intervention programs and research findings, developing services and supports within the community to improve systems of care for young children and their families, effectiveness research in early intervnetion programs and systems, and implications for research and practice. Extensive references conclude the paper

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Community based services, Early intervention, Families, Family support, High risk children, MCH research, Mental disorders, Prevention services, Substance abuse prevention, Young children

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U.S. General Accounting Office. 1996. At-risk and delinquent youth: Multiple federal programs raise efficiency questions. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 98 pp.

Annotation: This report lists 131 federal programs that may be used to benefit at-risk or delinquent youth (defined as ages 5-24). Information on each program includes administering agency, amount of federal funding, legislative authorization, objective, services provided, and target groups.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-96-34.

Keywords: Children, Directories, Federal programs, High risk adolescents, Youth

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